Background

Half of India’s population is likely to be living in cities and urban areas by 2050. The subject of clean and efficient energy has gained relevance lately in developing countries, as a tool for sustainable development, and improvement of public access to basic services and amenities.

The end of 2005 saw the launch of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM), by the Indian federal government (through the Ministry of Urban Development, MoUD), mainly to “encourage reforms and fast track planned development of identified cities with focus on efficiency in urban infrastructure and service delivery mechanisms, community participation, and accountability of urban local bodies (ULBs)/parastatal agencies towards citizens”.

The mission program is intended as a fast track gap funding mechanism for infrastructure development, essentially as a program to encourage/facilitate reforms and development for improved urban environments in Indian cities. With a glance at the City Development
Plans (CDPs) of the 64 mission cities, it is apparent that a majority of cities while describing their vision, commit to becoming ‘Green’ cities, ‘Sustainable’ cities, ‘Eco’ cities, ‘Efficient’ cities or/and ‘Clean’ cities.

The mission cities are currently at varying stages of project implementation under the JNNURM and other urban improvement initiatives with an overall assumption that improved infrastructure investments would ultimately lead to improved urban environment. These infrastructure investments are opportunities that, if utilized well, could actually lead to improved environments in the cities.

With the development of this background at the national level, the time was right for cities to begin initiatives addressing urban development strategies with clean development. It is with this view that the Urban Climate Project was formed, by aiming towards a comprehensive and multi sector clean development strategy backed by real investment capital.









Background Highlights
 

Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (2005-2012)

In 2005, the Indian national government’s Ministry of Urban Development launched the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM), mainly to “encourage reforms and fast track planned development of identified cities with focus on efficiency in urban infrastructure and service delivery mechanisms, community participation, and accountability of urban local bodies (ULBs)/parastatal agencies towards citizens”. The mission program is intended as a fast track gap funding mechanism for infrastructure development, essentially as a program to encourage/facilitate reforms and development for improved urban environments in Indian cities.

JNNURM at a glance:

Number of cities covered under JNNURM 65
Number of projects approved (as of February 2011) 530
Total approved project cost for 530 projects (Million INR) 602122
Cities with approved projects (Out of 65) 62
Completed projects 100

 

 
 
Rajkot and Coimbatore, as JNNURM mission cities, really represent what is happening on the ground in Indian cities today, and are well placed to be good models for replication in the rest of the country
Emani Kumar
Executive Director, ICLEI South Asia
The wind-solar PV hybrid system installed in Coimbatore as part of the Urban Climate Project is a real achievement in itself, and we are proud to promote it across the city and region
Anshul Mishra
IAS Municipal Commissioner, Coimbatore
Development that does not address issues of quality of life, pollution and climate change is not true development, and RMC’s efforts, along with the Urban Climate Project, strive to promote sustainable development
Dinesh Brahmbhatt
IAS, Municipal Commissioner, Rajkot
It is about building solutions for future generations and also improving communities in the more immediate, short-term future (and to) join the global effort to combat climate change at a local level
Richard Alden Feldon
International Programs Coordinator, ICLEI USA
The Urban Climate Project is a real model that we need to replicate in other jurisdictions. It is at the local level where transformation is going to take place. This is a century of cities (and) reducing energy costs and improving efficiency: that is the challenge.
David Cadman
Deputy Mayor, City of Vancouver and President, ICLEI
Programs such as the Urban Climate Project enable local elected officials to draw on a tremendous network of best practices.
Martin Chavez
Executive Director, ICLEI USA
Local governments are the innovators and incubators of change in terms of energy efficiency
Valerie Brown
Sustainability Director, Sonoma County, USA
NIUA will disseminate information about the Urban Climate Project to the 65 JNNURM cities through the PEARL network
Chetan Vaidya
Director, National Institute of Urban Affairs
India is a priority country, and clean energy and climate change are priority initiatives
Jeremy Gustafson
Director, Clean Energy and Environment Division, USAID